GS1, GTIN, GDSN--What do they have to do with UDI?

January 24, 2017 Daniel Henrich

If you are involved in your organization’s compliance program for Unique Device Identification (UDI), you have probably heard a lot of “G terms” being thrown around, like “GS1,” “GTIN” and “GDSN.”

But what do these terms mean and where do they fit in with FDA’s UDI requirements?

GS1 is a non-profit organization that develops and sets international standards for supply chain data across many different industries. When you see a barcode, whether on a box of cereal at a grocery store or on an ultrasound machine in a hospital, there is a very good chance it is formatted according to GS1 standards.

GTIN, or Global Trade Item Number, is a globally unique identification key maintained by the GS1 organization and has applications in various industries. Partly because it is already widely in use across the healthcare industry, the GTIN is one of three standards allowed by FDA to be used as the Device Identifier (DI) portion of a UDI.

As of January 13, 2017, 86% of the DIs registered on AccessGUDID were GTINs

Using GTINs as DIs allows device labelers to connect their UDI data records to a global network of product information. The GDSN (Global Data Synchronization Network) is used by trading partners throughout the healthcare industry (including manufacturers, distributors and hospital networks) to exchange product data in a standard format. By sharing UDI data with a GDSN-certified data pool, medical device labelers can ensure that the data submitted to FDA is made available at the same time to their trading partners.

Please note: While using GTIN as your primary DI is the first step toward the exchange of product data through the GDSN, merely using GTIN does not mean your data is in the GDSN. Product data must be placed into a GDSN-certified data pool.

In addition to simplifying the exchange of device product data for the U.S. market, an investment in the GDSN standard will allow device labelers to leverage their previous UDI compliance efforts to meet upcoming initiatives. These mandates of regulatory authorities outside the U.S. will likely include UDI in the EU and UK eProcurement.

While the UDI requirements of the IMDRF, European Commission and other authorities are expected to differ from each other in some points, GDSN will allow labelers to maintain a single comprehensive dataset to manage and update their device product data with FDA and around the globe. 

Do you have thoughts or questions about the link between UDI and GDSN? Share it with us! We want to hear from you!

 

Previous Article
National Drug Code (NDC) Assignment Guide eBook
National Drug Code (NDC) Assignment Guide eBook

Next Article
UDI Data Security: Why it should be important to you
UDI Data Security: Why it should be important to you

Data security has three facets—confidentiality, integrity and availability. Device labelers need to keep ea...

Need additional information?

Contact Us